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Levels of Implementation

Page history last edited by PBworks 7 years, 11 months ago

Levels of Implementation of Technology and Information Literacy Integration

The table below describes what a classroom looks like at various levels of implementation of technology integration. The levels progress from non-use, to use by the teacher, and ultimately to student-centered use in a 21stcentury learning environment.

 

Teachers begin with a variety of skills and at different levels as they implement the use of technology in the classroom. Over time, the goal is to have teachers become proficient in the use of technology in instruction and then to empower students to become the ultimate users of technology in their everyday learning activities. Student-centered learning, whether through the use of the concepts of Universal Design for Learning or project-based learning or other teaching strategies, is key to the successful use of technology in the classroom. For example, a teacher may currently use Inspiration software with a projector to record student responses to teacher-generated questions (Level 1). When students in a research group in the same classroom self-select the use of Inspiration to organize and investigate their research questions, the use of technology in this classroom will have moved to Level 5.

 

Not all change will be rapid or dramatic. However, as teachers gain expertise and confidence, incremental changes can be expected. This rubric may be used as a self-assessment, but it can also be effective for walk-through observations. When used to plan instruction, to monitor implementation of instruction, and to plan professional development in effective technology integration, the rubric provides a means to track progress toward creating a 21stcentury learning environments that support student centered learning and student engagement as students learn to think critically, solve problems, communicate, collaborate, create, and innovate.

 

Level 0

Non use

The use of digital content and technology resources in the classroom is non-existent due to:

  • Lack of access, or the perception that their use is inappropriate for the instructional setting or student readiness levels.

  • The use of instructional materials is predominately text-based (e.g., student handouts, worksheets).

Level 1

Teacher use

Digital content and technology resources are either:

  • Used by the classroom teacher for classroom or curriculum management tasks (e.g., taking attendance, entering grades, accessing email, retrieving lesson plans from the Internet),

  • Used by the classroom teacher to embellish or enhance teacher lectures or presentations (e.g., multimedia presentations), and/or

  • Used by students (usually unrelated to classroom instructional priorities) as a reward for prior work completed in class.

Level 2

Teacher-directed student use (low level cognitive demand)

Digital content and technology resources are used by students for extension activities, enrichment exercises, or information gathering assignments that generally reinforce lower cognitive skill development relating to the content under investigation. There is a pervasive use of student multimedia products, allowing students to present their content understanding in a digital format that may or may not reach beyond the classroom.

Level 3

Teacher-directed student use (higher level cognitive demand)

Digital content and technology resources are used by students to carry out teacher-directed tasks that emphasize higher levels of student cognitive processing relating to the content under investigation.

 

Level 4

Student-centered use

Students are fully engaged in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital content and technology resources. Emphasis is placed on learner-centered strategies that promote goal setting and self-monitoring, student action, and issues resolution that require higher levels of student cognitive processing and in-depth examination of the content.

Level 5

Student-initiated use

Emphasis is placed on learner-centered strategies that promote goal setting and self-monitoring, student action, and collaborations with other diverse groups (e.g., another school, different cultures, business establishments, and governmental agencies). Students’ use of digital content and technology resources is motivated by the highest levels of complex thinking (e.g., analysis, synthesis, evaluation) and in-depth understanding of the content experienced in the classroom. Students regularly engage in collaboration for authentic problem-solving and issues resolution.

Level 6

Independent student use that extends beyond the classroom

The instructional curriculum is entirely learner-based. The content emerges based on the needs of the learner according to his/her interests, needs, and/or aspirations and is supported by unlimited access to the most current digital content, technology resources and infrastructure available. Collaborations extending beyond the classroom that promote authentic student problem-solving and issues resolution are the norm.

 

Baltimore County Public Schools

Offices of Instructional Technology and Library Information Services

August 2009, Revised December 2009, Revised August 2010, Revised July 2011

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